ICT For Life Sciences Forum

Events Archive

Perceiving the World: Theories of Vision in Artificial Intelligence and Neuroscience.
Professor Alan Yuille

We humans simply have to open our eyes in order to immediately, and apparently effortlessly, perceive the world. We can recognize objects, estimate their depth, and determine the spatial layout of the scene we are viewing. But this apparent ease is very misleading. The task of interpreting the world from visual images is extremely difficult.

 

MORE >


 

The Doctor Will See You At Home
How Mobile Technology Is Changing Healthcare
Paolo Bonato, Ph.D.

Explore vaccination issues and more at a public forum with Sonya Pemberton, the producer of JABBED, a documentary premiering on SBS TV on Sunday 26 May 2013. “Diseases that were largely eradicated forty years ago are returning. Across the world children are getting sick and dying from preventable conditions because nervous parents are skipping their children’s shots. Yet the stories of vaccine reactions are frightening, with cases of people being damaged, even killed, by vaccines. How do we decide whether to vaccinate or not, and what are the real risks?

 

MORE >


 

Jabbed – love, fear and vaccines
Sonya Pemberton

Explore vaccination issues and more at a public forum with Sonya Pemberton, the producer of JABBED, a documentary premiering on SBS TV on Sunday 26 May 2013. “Diseases that were largely eradicated forty years ago are returning. Across the world children are getting sick and dying from preventable conditions because nervous parents are skipping their children’s shots. Yet the stories of vaccine reactions are frightening, with cases of people being damaged, even killed, by vaccines. How do we decide whether to vaccinate or not, and what are the real risks?

 

MORE >

 


Who benefits? A question about the future of health and medical research
Professor Warwick Anderson, CEO, NHMRC

The community and governments here and around the world have increasing expectation that publicly funded research will reap benefits more quickly and fully. Expectation are particularly high for health and medical research because if offers solutions for better health care, restraining costs of providing care, and building national prosperity through innovative industry growth.

This talk will discuss who benefits from health and medical research, including individuals, health consumers, policy makers, practicioners, business, governments and researchers themselves; and how. It will outline the challenges that health and medical research faces in providing the benefits in 2013 and beyond, including the rapidly changing nature of health and medical research itself, international and local financial pressures, barriers to uptake of research findings, wider participation of the community in research, the role of the industry and private investors, ethical challenges, maintaining trust, and empowering researchers in health practice and policy development.

 

MORE >


 

The 2013 Graeme Clark Oration
Geoffrey Lamb
President, Global Policy and Advocacy, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Geoffrey Lamb is the Gates Foundation’s President, Global Policy and Advocacy. He leads the foundation’s international policy and advocacy team, and its engagement with governments and international institutions. Lamb was previously Managing Director, Public Policy and a Senior Fellow in the foundation’s Global Development Program.

The oration reviewed the extraordinary successes of the past half century in reducing mortality and disease. It showed how investments in health have been critical for economic growth and the reduction of global poverty – and helped bring the goal of an end to absolute global poverty within generational sight.

 

MORE >

 


 

Can we repair the adult mind?
Alcino J. Silva

Alcino J Silva revealed the bold new world of brain repair.  He and his colleagues at the University of California, Los Angeles, have shown that the adult brain can be repaired.  Millions of people suffer from cognitive deficits associated with aging, learning disabilities, autism and schizophrenia.  But it’s long been thought abnormalities in brain development are irreversible.  Dr Silva has broken that paradigm.  He says the adult brain is more plastic.

 

MORE >

 

 


 

The geology of humanity – The power of data to change our worldview
Owen Gaffney

Owen Gaffney presented Welcome to the Anthropocene, a stunning view of the vast scale of human influence on our planet. His unique data visualization captures why many now argue humanity has driven our planet into a new geological era – the Anthropocene –defined by our impact on Planet Earth.

Owen explored how global changes driven by the Industrial Revolution, even bigger changes driven by globalization, and changes driven by the digital revolution are creating a globally interconnected society and what this means for the future.

 

MORE >

 

 


 

Paroxysmal neurological events –The new genetics solves age-old questions
Professor Ingrid Scheffer

Professor Ingrid Scheffer is a paediatric neurologist and epileptologist at the University of Melbourne, Australia. Her work together with Professor Sam Berkovic, with the molecular geneticists at the Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Adelaide, has led the field of epilepsy genetics research over the last 21 years.

For many years, there was debate about whether paroxysmal events occurring in sleep were a type of epileptic seizure or a movement disorder. Similarly the aetiological relationship between movement disorders and epilepsies occurring in one person has been a matter of intense scrutiny.
MORE >

 


 

2012 Graeme Clark Oration
Professor Dame Linda Partridge DBE FRS FRSE

Professor Dame Linda Partridge imagines a future in which we all stay young by taking a pill that reduces the impact of ageing. She’s not promising immortality, rather she’s working toward a future in which we age gracefully – healthy, happy and active until the end.

MORE >

 


 

Global Biomolecular Information Infrastructure and Potential Australian Roles
Mr Graham Cameron, Melbourne Brain Imaging Centre

Biology has developed high-throughput methods to collect staggering amounts of data on the molecules of life, their interactions and behaviour. In response to this, global science has established extensive collections of biomolecular data and their phenotypic correlates. Major service centres such as the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI), the National Center for Biology Information (NCBI) in the USA, Japan’s Centre for Information Biology and the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, collaborate to collect organise and share this information with the scientific community

Registrations closed
The Auditorium, Melbourne Brain Centre
Kenneth Myer Building, The University of Melbourne
Cnr. Royal Parade & Genetics Lane, Parkville

MORE >


 

A personal view of Systems Biology: What it is, and what it should be.

Systems Biology is a term that is much bandied about. While many commentators agree that it holds ‘great promise’ for biomedical science research.

Registrations closed
Eastern Resource Centre, Charles Pearson Theatre
The University of Melbourne, Building 171
Parkville Victoria 3052 Australia

Presenter: Associate Professor Edmund Crampin

MORE >

 


 

Optical Stimulation of Neural Tissue

Registrations closed
Low-intensity, pulsed infrared light provides a novel nerve stimulation modality that avoids the limitations of traditional electrical methods such as necessity of contact, presence of a stimulation artifact, and relatively poor spatial precision.

MORE >

 


 

Systems and Technological Challenges to Personalized Medicine

Registrations closed
Personalized medicine aims to tailor medical treatment at individual patients based on genetic, biochemical or physiological information.
The variability between individual patients has long been recognized as one of the challenges of modern medicine and pharmacology.

MORE >

 


 

Reverse engineering the immune system

Registrations closed
Research of the immune system is undergoing significant changes, following the fundamental advances of Melbourne scientist Macfarlane Burnet in the 1950’s.  Engineering concepts are being applied to make theories about the behavior of the immune system quantitative and amenable to computer simulation.  Professor Hodgkin will present evidence that engineering concepts have a role in understanding the construction of the system.  He will endeavor to convince the audience that the immune system is a highly accessible model for computational biologists, where advances can inform cell and molecular biology at the cutting edge, while having important implications for improving human health.

MORE >


 

Biomedical Imaging Using MRI: Professor Roger Ordidge

Registrations closed
The principles of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) will be explained and examples of applications of high magnetic field MRI systems will be presented. These will include applications in animal models of human disease and examples of human brain studies. Cerebral tissue contains water molecules that are diffusing due to their inherent thermal energy (temperature).

MORE >